Gut

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Gut microbiota has been shown to be involved in a variety of human physiology and pathology, including metabolism, nutrition, immunomodulation, and gastrointestinal cancer.

The composition of gut microbiota is unique to each individual and is influenced by many factors, such as age, diet, geography, and lifestyle.

The human gut is home to a vast community of microbes, which play a crucial role in our health. It is also linked to a number of diseases, such as gastrointestinal cancer.

Most of the microbes in the gut are beneficial, helping us to digest our food, produce vitamins and protect us from pathogens. However, some types of gut bacteria can be harmful, for example, those that cause food poisoning or infections.

The gut microbiota is constantly changing, and dysbiosis (an imbalance in the gut microbiome) has been linked to a number of diseases.

Therefore, it is important to maintain a healthy balance of gut bacteria. This can be done by eating a healthy diet, avoiding antimicrobial drugs where possible, and taking probiotics or prebiotics.

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