Chronic Inflammation

Chronic inflammation is a type of inflammation that persists over a long period of time. It is characterized by the presence of inflammatory mediators in the blood and tissues, which can damage healthy cells and organs.

It is a response to cell damage and can be caused by a variety of factors, including infections, autoimmune disorders, and exposure to toxins.

Chronic inflammation has been linked to a number of diseases, including cancer, heart disease, stroke, and Alzheimer's disease. Treatment for chronic inflammation typically involves the use of anti-inflammatory drugs, such as corticosteroids or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).

In some cases, surgery may be necessary to remove the source of the inflammation. Chronic inflammation is a major health problem worldwide and is a major contributor to the burden of disease.

In the United States, chronic inflammation is responsible for an estimated $123 billion in health care costs each year.