Tendons

Tendons are tough, fibrous cords of tissue that connect muscles to bones. They can withstand great tension and transmit the force generated by muscles to bones. This allows the body to move.

Most tendons are surrounded by a sheath of slippery tissue called synovium. This helps the tendon glide quickly over adjacent bones and other tissues. There are two types of tendons: flexor tendons and extensor tendons.

Flexor tendons are located on the anterior (front) side of the body and attach muscles to bones. They are responsible for bending the joints. Extensor tendons are located on the posterior (back) side of the body and connect muscles to bones. They are responsible for straightening the joints.

The tendons in the human body are made up of two types of collagen: Type I and Type III. Type I collagen is the most abundant type and makes up 90-95% of the tendon.

It is a robust protein that gives tendons their strength. Type III collagen is a weaker type of collagen and makes up 5-10% of the tendon. It provides support and structure to the tendon.

Tendons are avascular, meaning they do not have their own blood supply. They rely on the surrounding muscles and soft tissues for nutrients and oxygen. This can make them susceptible to injury.

Tendinitis is an inflammation of the tendon that can cause pain and stiffness. It is often caused by overuse or repetitive motions. Tendinosis is a degenerative condition that results in the weakening of the tendon. It is often caused by age-related wear and tears.

Tendons are an essential part of the musculoskeletal system and play a vital role in the movement. Without them, the body would not be able to move.