Grave's Disease

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Grave's disease is an autoimmune disease that affects the thyroid gland. The thyroid is a small, butterfly-shaped gland located in the neck. It produces hormones that regulate the body's metabolism.

In Grave's disease, the immune system attacks the thyroid gland and causes it to overproduce hormones. This can lead to a number of symptoms, including weight loss, anxiety, tremors, and bulging eyes.

Grave's disease is the most common cause of hyperthyroidism in the United States. It is more common in women than in men and usually occurs between the ages of 20 and 65.

While there is no cure for Grave's disease, it can be treated with medication to control the symptoms. In some cases, surgery may be necessary to remove the thyroid gland or to relieve the pressure building up behind the eyes.

Grave's disease can be a serious condition, but with treatment, most people with the disease can live normal, healthy lives.