ADHD

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is a neurodevelopmental disorder that is characterized by problems with focus, hyperactivity, and impulsiveness. It is estimated that ADHD affects approximately 5 percent of school-aged children.

Symptoms of ADHD can lead to difficulties in school and social situations. Early diagnosis and treatment of ADHD can help to reduce the impact of the condition.

There are three types of ADHD: inattentive type, hyperactive-impulsive type, and combined type. symptoms of ADHD vary from person to person. Some people with ADHD may only have problems with one type of symptom, while others may have all three types.

Inattentive type: This type is characterized by problems with focus and attention. People with this type of ADHD may have difficulty paying attention to details, sustaining attention to tasks, and following instructions.

Hyperactive-impulsive type: This type is characterized by problems with hyperactivity and impulsiveness. People with this type of ADHD may have difficulty sitting still, controlling their impulses, and waiting their turn.

Combined type: This type is characterized by problems with both focus and hyperactivity/impulsiveness. People with this type of ADHD may have difficulty with all of the above symptoms.

ADHD is typically diagnosed in childhood, though it can sometimes go undiagnosed into adulthood. Diagnosis is based on a combination of factors, including symptoms, family history, and observation by teachers and parents.

There is no one “cure” for ADHD, but there are many effective treatments available. Treatment typically involves a combination of medication and behavioral therapy.

Medication can help to control the symptoms of ADHD, while behavioral therapy can help people with ADHD learn how to manage their symptoms and cope with the challenges of the condition.